A Problem Half-Solved

 

Charles Kettering once famously said,
“A problem well-stated is a problem half-solved.”

Mr. Kettering is among the more accomplished engineers and inventors in American history, so it’s easy to read his quote and apply it to physical manifestations of problems.

Much more difficult is to apply the same principle to disagreements in business and personal relationships.

The common tendency is to experience a disagreement and rush headlong into patching it with a quick fix.

But disagreements between people are, for the most part, somewhat more nuanced than, say, a flat tire…

What’s being lost in the usual rush to placate is a prime opportunity to uncover any problems that are at the root of the disagreement…
Ergo, the chance to truly solve those problems.

Better then, to slow down and take full stock of the details of the disagreement. Then, you can apply a process for finding and implementing a solution that creates a resolution.

This requires equal parts maturity and clarity.

E.g.,
Look.
See.
Imagine.
Create.

Or,
Listen
Ask & Understand
Validate

Or,
Question.
Hypothesis.
Prediction.
Experiment.
Observation.
Analysis.
Conclusion.

The crux is whether the problem
has, in fact, been identified and clearly-stated.